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Monday, January 27, 2020 | History

5 edition of The ethics of Aristotle found in the catalog.

The ethics of Aristotle

The ethics of Aristotle

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  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Dent, Dutton in London, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ethics,
  • Ethics, Greek

  • Edition Notes

    Statement(introduction by J.A. Smith translated by D.P. Chase).
    SeriesEveryman"s library no. 547
    ContributionsChase, Drummond Percy, 1820-1902.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxviii, 290 p. ;
    Number of Pages290
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17162641M

    We said, then, that it is not a disposition; for if it were it might belong to some one who was asleep throughout his life, living the life of a plant, or, again, to some one who was suffering the greatest misfortunes. For, besides what we have said, the man who does not rejoice in noble actions is not even good; since no one would call a man just who did not enjoy acting justly, nor any man liberal who did not enjoy liberal actions; and similarly in all other cases. They say, however, that the good is determinate, while pleasure is indeterminate, because it admits of degrees. Just and brave acts, and other virtuous acts, we do in relation to each other, observing our respective duties with regard to contracts and services and all manner of actions and with regard to passions; and all of these seem to be typically human. Those who object that that at which all things aim is not necessarily good are, we may surmise, talking nonsense. Will not the gods seem absurd if they make contracts and return deposits, and so on?

    Now of first principles we see some by induction, some by perception, some by a certain habituation, and others too in other ways. In addition, honor is ephemeral, whereas happiness is to be sustainable. Only voluntry action can be virtuous. Most recently updated: January 28, Project Gutenberg updates its listing of IP addresses approximately monthly. There must be one final end of all human actions, because a human action by definition is one that is done on purpose and for a definite goal.

    If this is so, virtuous actions must be in themselves pleasant. For while we may become pleased quickly as we may become angry quickly, we cannot be pleased quickly, not even in relation to some one else, while we can walk, or grow, or the like, quickly. A good man they thinksince he lives with his mind fixed on what is noble, will submit to argument, while a bad man, whose desire is for pleasure, is corrected by pain like a beast of burden. So the pleasures of creatures different in kind differ in kind, and it is plausible to suppose that those of a single species do not differ.


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The ethics of Aristotle book

Aristotle and Kant are virtue ethicist since they attempt to offer moral advice to the society. For instance, a person who plays the flute well is a good flutist.

Section 4: The Good cannot is not a universal Idea, as the Platonists claim, because this universal Idea does not encompass the range of things are considered good and had no practical ramifications. Now he who exercises his reason and cultivates it seems to be both in the best state of mind and most dear to the gods.

It would seem from what has been said that he can do this better if he makes himself capable of legislating. To entrust to chance what is greatest and most noble would be a very defective arrangement. This argument seems to show it to be one of the goods, and no more a good than any other; for every good is more worthy of choice along with another good than taken alone.

Another belief which harmonizes with our account is that the happy man lives well and does well; for we have practically defined happiness as a sort of good life and good action.

Aristotle reasoned that human must have a function specifict o humans and that this function must be an activity of the of soul in accordance with reason. Hence a young man is not a proper hearer of lectures on political science; for he is inexperienced in the actions that occur in life, but its discussions start from these and are about these; and, further, since he tends to follow his passions, his study will be vain and unprofitable, because the end aimed at is not knowledge but action.

For they seem to be bound up together and not to admit of separation, since without activity pleasure does not arise, and every activity is completed by the attendant pleasure. And happiness is thought to depend on leisure; for we are busy that we may have leisure, and make war that we may live in peace.

Now this would seem to be in agreement both with what we said before and with the truth.

Comparison Of Aristotle And Aquinas And The Highest Good

Life seems to be common even to plants, but we are seeking what is peculiar to man. The munificence man spent lavishly and largely for the noble purpose without calculating the cost. So the pleasures of creatures different in kind differ in kind, and it is plausible to suppose that those of a single species do not differ.

Have the carpenter, then, and the tanner certain functions or activities, and has man none? Further clarification concerning Aristotle's position in regard to pleasure is made when he distinguishes between pleasure and happiness. Now the activity of the practical virtues is exhibited in political or military affairs, but the actions concerned with these seem to be unleisurely.

Whether pleasure is something that is always good was a disputed question in Aristotle's day. If we were to run through them all, the circumstances of action would be found trivial and unworthy of gods. Of the irrational element one division seems to be widely distributed, and vegetative in its nature, I mean that which causes nutrition and growth; The ethics of Aristotle book it is this kind of power of the soul that one must assign to all nurslings and to embryos, and this same power to fullgrown creatures; this is more reasonable than to assign some different power to them.

Moral virtue is a relative mean between extremes of excess and deficiency, and in general the moral life is one of moderation in all things except virtue. For every movement e. The man is totally responsible for your happiness.

Let us examine this question, however, on another occasion; the self-sufficient we now define as that which when isolated makes life desirable and lacking in nothing; and such we think happiness to be; and further we think it most desirable of all things, without being counted as one good thing among others- if it were so counted it would clearly be made more desirable by the addition of even the least of goods; for that which is added becomes an excess of goods, and of goods the greater is always more desirable.

For to get any one whatever-any one who is put before us-into the right condition is not for the first chance comer; if any one can do it, it is the man who knows, just as in medicine and all other matters which give scope for care and prudence.

For there are, we may say, three prominent types of life- that just mentioned, the political, and thirdly the contemplative life. For to such persons, as to the incontinent, knowledge brings no profit; but to those who desire and act in accordance with a rational principle knowledge about such matters will be of great benefit.

Now those activities are desirable in themselves from which nothing is sought beyond the activity. In medicine this is health, in strategy victory, in architecture a house, in any other sphere something else, and in every action and pursuit the end; for it is for the sake of this that all men do whatever else they do.Apr 08,  · Nicomachean Ethics Essay Words | 4 Pages.

In the book Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle uses his collection of lecture notes in order to establish the best way to live and acquire happiness. Aristotle says, “Virtue, then, is a state that decides consisting in a.

Apr 23,  · The Nicomachean Ethics is one of Aristotle’s most widely read and influential works. Ideas central to ethics—that happiness is the end of human endeavor, that moral virtue is formed through action and habituation, and that good action requires prudence—found their most powerful proponent in the person medieval scholars simply called “the Philosopher.”/5.

Nicomachean Ethics Book 10 Summary Course Hero. The History of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 1 The History of Aristotle’ s Nicomachean Ethics is a book that defines Aristotle’s best‐known work on ethics.

Nicomachean Ethics is generally recognized as the most complete and the most important of his writings on ethics. Aristotle, The Nicomachean Ethics, Trans. J. A.

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K. Thomson (London: Penguin, ). Book 1. Aristotle’s method is to begin with a generalization which he holds to be true, although at this stage he is only presenting it as a proposition. Dec 01,  · Aristotle sees pleasure, honour and virtue as significant 'wants' for people, and then argues that virtue is the most important of these.

Nicomachean Ethics

In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle makes the claim that happiness is something which is both precious and final.

This seems to be so because it is a first principle or ultimate starting point.5/5(5). Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle Translated by W. D. Ross Batoche Books Kitchener Contents BOOK I 1 Every art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and pursuit, is Nicomachean Ethics/5 good judge of that subject, and the man who has received an all-round education is a good judge in general.

Hence a young man is not a proper.